Career Options of Marine Biology


Career Options

Intro

A row of seats in a room

For many people, the word “marine biologist” conjures up visions of a person standing on a beach collecting seashells. In reality, marine biologists are experts on the life that thrives in oceans, estuaries and other brackish coastal habitats. They study coral reefs and kelp forests to understand their ecology and how they respond to changing ocean conditions. They also research ways to protect these fragile environments from pollution or overfishing.

A degree in Marine Biology can lead students into such diverse fields as chemical sensing for pollution monitoring; fisheries management; coastal engineering; conservation biology; aquaculture design and management; natural resource protection legislation development and enforcement, and wetland restoration project planning and implementation among others.

So what does a marine biologist actually do? The answer to that question varies depending on the field in which they work, but there are some common threads. Many marine biologists conduct research to learn more about the ocean and the creatures that live there. This can involve collecting samples of water or plant life, as well as observing animals in their natural habitat.

Some marine biologists work in laboratories, where they analyze their samples to look for patterns or clues about how different species interact with each other and their environment. Others may work in zoos or aquariums, where they help care for the animals and educate the public about ocean conservation.

Still, others work directly with policymakers to develop laws and regulations aimed at protecting vulnerable marine environments from pollution or overdevelopment.

No matter what field they work in, marine biologists all share a passion for the ocean and its inhabitants. If you’re interested in a career in marine biology, read on to learn more about the different types of jobs available in this exciting field.

Research Marine Biologist

A research marine biologist studies the ocean and the creatures that live there. This can involve collecting samples of water or plant life, as well as observing animals in their natural habitat. Some research marine biologists work in laboratories, where they analyze their samples to look for patterns or clues about how different species interact with each other and their environment.

Other research marine biologists may work in zoos or aquariums, where they help care for the animals and educate the public about ocean conservation. Still others may work directly with policymakers to develop laws and regulations aimed at protecting vulnerable marine environments from pollution or overdevelopment.

Oceanographers

Oceanographers study the physical and chemical properties of the ocean and the interactions between the ocean and the Earth’s atmosphere, land, and life. They may work in a variety of settings, including government agencies, private businesses, research laboratories, and colleges and universities. Oceanographers typically have a bachelor’s degree in oceanography or a related field. Some jobs may require a master’s degree or doctorate.

Aquaculture scientists

Aquaculture scientists conduct research on fish farming and other forms of aquatic animal husbandry. They may work in a variety of settings, including government agencies, private businesses, research laboratories, and colleges and universities. Aquaculture scientists typically have a bachelor’s degree in aquaculture or a related field. Some jobs may require a master’s degree or doctorate.

Fisheries

Fisheries biologists study the biology of fish and other aquatic animals. They may work in a variety of settings, including government agencies, private businesses, research laboratories, and colleges and universities. Fisheries biologists typically have a bachelor’s degree in fisheries biology or a related field. Some jobs may require a master’s degree or doctorate.

Conservationists

Conservationists work to protect the natural environment and its resources. They may work in a variety of settings, including government agencies, private businesses, research laboratories, and nonprofit organizations. Conservationists typically have a bachelor’s degree in conservation or a related field. Some jobs may require a master’s degree or doctorate.

Environmental educators

Environmental educators teach people about the natural environment and how to protect it. They may work in a variety of settings, including government agencies, private businesses, research laboratories, and educational institutions. Environmental educators typically have a bachelor’s degree in environmental education or a related field. Some jobs may require a master’s degree or doctorate.

Zoologists

Zoologists study the biology of animals. They may work in a variety of settings, including government agencies, private businesses, research laboratories, and zoos. Zoologists typically have a bachelor’s degree in zoology or a related field. Some jobs may require a master’s degree or doctorate.

Ecologists

Ecologists study the relationship between organisms and their environment. They may work in a variety of settings, including government agencies, private businesses, research laboratories, and colleges and universities. Ecologists typically have a bachelor’s degree in ecology or a related field. Some jobs may require a master’s degree or doctorate.

Conclusion

A person using a laptop

Marine biologists, oceanographers, aquaculture scientists, fisheries biologists, conservationists, environmental educators, zoologists and ecologists all play important roles in helping to protect our planet’s oceans. They may work in a variety of settings, including government agencies, private businesses, research laboratories, and colleges and universities. These professionals typically have a bachelor’s degree in their field of study. Some jobs may require a master’s degree or doctorate.

Subscribe to our monthly Newsletter
Subscribe to our monthly Newsletter